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  • Writer's pictureShane Almgren

Manny Cuevas: Fashioner Designer to the Stars

Manny Cuevas was born into fashion design royalty. He began working with his father – the world-renown designer Manuel – at the age of 6, designing for and dressing everyone from American Presidents Dwight Eisenhower, Ronald Reagan and both George Bushes – to music royalty such as Liberace, Johnny Cash, The Rat Pack Elite, John Lennon, Dolly Parton, Roy Rogers, The Grateful Dead, The Rolling Stones, Bob Dylan, Jimi Hendrix, The Jackson Five, David Lee Roth, Kid Rock, Jack White, and Kenny Chesney – to Hollywood icons like Marlon Brando, John Wayne, Jack Nicholson, John Travolta, and Sylvester Stallone, to name a few.


After being approached in 2006 by Alan Tucker (who helped Calvin Klein create and launch the Calvin Klein brand) about creating a ready-to-wear line, Manny has developed into a global fashion force of his own. He's headlined fashioned weeks in New York and Mexico City, and his signature clothing line, Wear it Out by Manny, can be found in stores and boutiques around the globe. And Manny himself designed the suit that Johnny Cash was laid to rest in.



Manny Cuevas, fashion designer



Episode Highlights

Step into the vibrant world of fashion as we sit down with Manny Cuevas, the formidable designer who's stitched his legacy into the very fabric of the industry. Growing up amidst the swirl of his father Manuel's tailor shop, Manny's tale is woven with the golden threads of heritage and innovation. From the eclectic celebrity clientele of his youth to the birth of his own label, Wear It Out by Manny, we explore the symphony of style and music that's danced through his career, especially the beat of change that came with his move to the heart of Nashville.


We trace the footsteps of his journey as he crafts limited edition lines, fusing the exclusivity of couture with the reach of ready-to-wear. But it's not just about the glitz of the garments; Manny gets real about the hustle it takes to raise $8.9 million, storm New York Fashion Week, and the rush of seeing his designs sell like hotcakes in the aftermath. His story isn't just a lesson in style‚ it's a masterclass in turning dreams into tangible triumphs.


As we wrap up, Manny's passion for design unfurls like the finest silk, revealing a philosophy that's as personal as it is professional. He imparts wisdom to budding designers, reflecting on moments that marked his career‚ like Bob Dylan's Vatican performance and the shine of a lifetime achievement award. But it's the intimate memories, the blend of art and celebrity from his father's shop, and the solid foundation of support that truly dress the soul of this episode. Join us, and let Manny Cuevas tailor an experience that will leave you inspired, informed, and immeasurably enriched by the threads that connect us all.


We cover a ton of cool topics in this extended episode including:

  • Getting started in his dad's shop at the age of 6 by digging leather scraps out of the trash and sewing them together

  • Working with Country Music elite like Johhny Cash, Waylon Jennings, Little Jimmy Dickens, Marty Robbins, and Porter Wagoner 

  • Being bounced on the knees of Salvador Dali as a child

  • When major designer labels knock off your designs

  • Being mentored by Alan Tucker, co-creator of Calvin Klein

  • How taking big, unheard-of risks paid off in big ways headlining fashion weeks in New York and Mexico City

  • Working in the shadow of his father, legendary fashion icon Manuel, and the challenge of making a name for himself

  • Designing Bob Dylan's stage outfit for his concert in front of the Pope at the Vatican

  • A run-in with Sylvester Stallone as a kid

  • Learning lessons about how a man should talk to a woman by watching Ronald speak to Nancy Reagan...and SO much more!


Listen



Read the Complete Transcript


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